The work of designing with accessibility at the forefront is a cross-functional team effort.


Connect with users who have a disability earlier in the process to gain insight into their needs—don’t make accessibility an afterthought.


Accessible design has multiple facets, and a great place for designers to get started is with the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). They developed the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, known as WCAG, which provides groundwork for building a more accessible web experience.


The WCAG guidelines are organized around four principles to solve design problems with increased usability, via the acronym POUR.


It’s always helpful for designers to be able to make a business case for accessible design. Building a more inclusive website is great for SEO and usability. Accessible websites and products can reach a wider audience and increase reach of a product exponentially.


Design


by 99U
in 7 Accessibility Lessons for Designers

by 99U

in 7 Accessibility Lessons for Designers

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