Before you explain, defend or offer to fix your work, it’s essential that you understand exactly what the other person doesn‘t like about it.


Don’t react defensively – or aggressively – no matter how hurt, disappointed, or annoyed you feel. Start by taking a deep breath and reminding yourself of your goal.


Move the conversation forward to a positive conclusion: either (a) getting the work accepted in its current form or (b) agreeing on what needs changing. Solution-focused questions are powerful tools for doing this.


Your goal is to leave the room with a clearly agreed upon next step towards a solution. They may still be skeptical or unsure, but at least you know what you need to do to get the work accepted.


Process


by 99U
in How to Deal with Crushing Feedback on Your Creative Work

by 99U

in How to Deal with Crushing Feedback on Your Creative Work

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